logobyline

twitter   facebook   cfyj donate   amazon smile instagramlogo

Juvenile Justice News

Youth Zone Corner: Find the ‘why’ of troubling youth behavior

Psychological trauma — words that no one likes to hear, especially when these words coincide with some of our community's most vulnerable: children and teenagers. There is no doubt that psychological trauma is a hard topic of discussion, but it is an important one because it drastically affects a large number of our youth.

‘Every Youth Prison in the Country Should Be Closed’

The nearly two-centuries-old approach in America to institutionalizing and detaining young people who run afoul of the law must be replaced by a system that takes into account the different developmental needs of youth—and the interests of society in making sure they aren’t channeled into a lifetime of criminal behavior, says a paper sponsored by the Harvard Kennedy School and the National Institute of Justice.

‘Raise the Age’ Is the New ‘Ban the Box’

Thousands of 16- and 17-year-olds across the country are poised to benefit from criminal justice reform’s latest bipartisan effort. Of the nine remaining states that automatically try 17-year-olds in the adult criminal justice system (two of them deem 16-year-olds "adults" for the purpose of prosecution), legislation pending in seven of the states would shift those cases into the juvenile system, where penalties are lesser, detention facilities less harsh, and opportunities for rehabilitation greater. 

‘This Is Wrong’: The Hurdles Keeping Sexual Assault Survivors Behind Bars From Services

Jessica Seipel still remembers how intimidated she was the first time she entered a prison. “You go through a door and hear it slam behind you,” she told Rewire. “Then you go through another door and you hear that slam behind you.”

“Raise the Age” Laws are Smart for All Involved

Incarcerating juveniles in adult prison facilities was banned in 2002 with the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. The act was intended to protect juveniles and now only in very limited circumstances can they still be jailed in adult prisons.

“They Call Us Monsters”: teenage boys facing life in prison become screenwriters

Juan Gamez has close-cropped, black hair and a baby face that remains expressionless except when he smiles. As a 16-year-old boy facing 90 years to life for first-degree murder, he seems to float somewhere above or below this fact, as do Antonio Hernandez and Jarad Nava, the other teenage boys awaiting similar sentences in Ben Lear’s moving documentary, “They Call Us Monsters,” a film that connects a 20-week screenwriting class inside Sylmar, a segregated unit for juveniles being tried as adults, with the passing of SB 260, legislation that grants youth serving life sentences the possibility of parole. 

<<  13 14 15 16 17 [18